Publication Date

2008

Document Type

Masters Thesis

Department

School for Social Work

Abstract

By comparing a residential school for the deaf and hard of hearing with a mainstream inclusion educational setting, the performance of school-aged children who are deaf is presented. Previous research within the area of education for individuals who are deaf was gathered and used as a historical basis for the subsequent investigation. With the study of Erik Erikson's psychosocial stages of development and Lev Vygotsky's zone of proximal development, an analysis of education for individuals who are deaf was conducted and re-synthesized to provide a new understanding of education. Erik Erikson's psychosocial stages of development and Lev Vygotsky's Zone of Proximal development was synthesized specifically with the population of individuals who are deaf to fit their specific needs in learning. Previous research and performance was also specifically studied in the areas of academics, social involvements, and identities. The literature identifies several factors that affect the academic achievement of children who are deaf compared to their hearing peers. Factors include a difficulty in communication and social interaction. Through the lenses of Erikson's and Vygotsky's theories, conclusions showed the possibility of academic delay and future failures when students are isolated and prevented from developing the ability learn industrious skills. Students who are deaf were also suggested as not needing the same accommodations as other individuals listed under special education, but needing more academic rigor and social opportunities with both deaf and hearing peers.

Comments

Thesis (M.S.W.)--Smith College School for Social Work, Northampton, Mass., 2008. iii, 93 p. Includes bibliographical references (p. 89-93)