Author

Aviva Bellman

Publication Date

2017

Document Type

Masters Thesis

Study Type

Qualitative

Degree Name

Master of Social Work

Department

School for Social Work

Keywords

Women psychotherapists-Psychology, Jewish psychotherapists-Psychology, Jewish women-Psychology, Jews-Identity, Antisemitism, Psychotherapy-Religious aspects-Judaism, Jewish identity, Collective trauma, Psychotherapy

Abstract

This study examined the subjective identities of Jewish women psychotherapists, as well as the ways in which they give meaning to their psychotherapeutic practice. Twelve narratives by Jewish women psychotherapists were utilized as secondary data, originally published in an edited book by Greene and Brodbar (2010). The study used a Jewish feminist epistemological stance, an intersubjective understanding of the therapeutic relationship, and an interpretive (hermeneutic) phenomenological approach, which led the researcher to self-reflect over the course of the analytical process (Ginsberg, 2002; Lopez and Willis, 2004). Narratives were analyzed for recurrent themes and sub-themes (Smith, Flowers, & Larkin, 2009). Implications of results are twofold: they add to the dearth of literature centering the experiences of Jewish women, and they contribute to our understandings of how sociocultural identity shapes the clinician and the clinical encounter.

Language

English

Comments

iv, 153 pages. Includes bibliographical references (pages 118-124)

Included in

Social Work Commons

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