Publication Date

2017

Document Type

Masters Thesis

Study Type

Quantitative

Degree Name

Master of Social Work

Department

School for Social Work

Keywords

Secondary traumatic stress, Social workers-Job satisfaction, Mindfulness (Psychology), Interns-Psychology, Burn out (Psychology), Health self-care, Compassion fatigue, Compassion satisfaction, Mindfulness, Social workers, Social work interns, Professional quality of life, Burnout, Self-care

Abstract

The risk for compassion fatigue among social workers is well-documented in previous literature. However, research is still needed to uncover factors that may mitigate compassion fatigue in this population. This cross-sectional exploratory study examined the relationships between compassion fatigue, compassion satisfaction, and mindfulness among social workers and graduate-level social work interns. Social workers (n = 76) and graduate-level social work interns (n = 47) completed the Five Facets of Mindfulness Questionnaire (FFMQ) and the Professional Quality of Life Scale (ProQOL). Results indicated that social workers and graduate-level interns with higher levels of mindfulness exhibited lower levels of compassion fatigue and higher levels of compassion satisfaction. The findings suggest that mindfulness may potentially play a role in reducing social workers’ and graduate-level interns’ risk for compassion fatigue and in increasing their potential for compassion satisfaction.

Language

English

Comments

iv, 55 pages. Includes bibliographical references (pages 41-45)

Available for download on Saturday, August 20, 2022

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