Publication Date

2007

Document Type

Masters Thesis

Department

School for Social Work

Abstract

This descriptive exploratory study examines the relationship of clinical experience and attitude toward countertransference disclosure and use of countertransference disclosure. The study surveyed therapists for answers to the following questions: Are there any differences in the attitude towards countertransference disclosure between experienced and inexperienced clinicians? Are there any differences in the use of countertransference disclosure between experienced and inexperienced clinicians? Is there an association between attitude toward and use of countertransference disclosure for the sample as a whole; and is there any variance in this association between experienced and inexperienced therapists? Three-hundred-and-thirty-seven therapists completed the survey, yielding significant results. The major findings included the following: Experienced therapists use countertransference disclosure significantly more frequently than inexperienced therapists, and there is a more significant positive relationship between attitude toward and use of countertransference disclosure in experienced therapists. The data also showed that inexperienced therapists have a more favorable attitude towards countertransference disclosure than do experienced therapists, even though they use it less frequently. There is a significant positive relationship between attitude toward and use of countertransference disclosure for inexperienced therapists, but it is not as strong as that for experienced therapists. Although the differences between attitude and use were significant, the measure of difference between inexperienced and experienced therapists was actually quite small.

Comments

iii, 104 p. Thesis (M.S.W.)--Smith College School for Social Work, Northampton, Mass., 2007. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 82-88).