Publication Date

2007

Document Type

Masters Thesis

Department

School for Social Work

Abstract

This qualitative study explores male to female transgender sex workers' experiences within the social service and health care systems in San Francisco, California. Twenty one male to female transgender sex worker participants were asked to rate services provided to them by the social service and health care systems. Ten of these participants were then asked a series of questions about their experiences within the social service and health care systems in San Francisco. Participants' racial identities and ages were not diverse. Most participants identified as African American and their ages fell between the ranges of 41 and 50 within this study. All participants had worked as sex workers and accessed social services and health care within the last five years. Participants rated health care and social services positively and discussed areas in which these systems could better address for the male to female transgender sex worker community in San Francisco. The major findings reveal the positive services that male to female transgender sex workers have experienced from health care and social services in San Francisco. These findings also reveal the continued discrimination this group faces within these systems and the work force, and the continued violence and health risks they face on the streets. Lastly, this study implicates the need for job trainings for this group and sensitivity trainings for providers and the general public.

Comments

iii, 104 p. Thesis (M.S.W.)--Smith College School for Social Work, Northampton, Mass., 2007. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 87-90).