Publication Date

2013

Document Type

Masters Thesis

Department

School for Social Work

Keywords

Women college students-Psychology, Women college students-Economic conditions, Women college students-Social life and customs, Academic achievement-Economic aspects, Stress (Psychology), College women, Financial stress, Academic functioning, Social functioning

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between financial stress and academic and social functioning and satisfaction in a volunteering sample of undergraduate residential college women in Western Massachusetts, which included students who identified their enrollment status as either dependent or independent as defined by 2011-2012 federal financial aid guidelines. The main research question asked to investigate these relationships is "What is the relationship between financial stress and academic and social functioning and satisfaction in undergraduate residential college women's experiences?" The major findings in the study showed varying degrees of significance from moderate to strong that reflect both negative and positive correlations between the independent variable financial stress and the dependent variables, academic and social functioning and satisfaction. However, because of the limited responses received, and the study's small sample, these findings are inconclusive in regards to the research questions asked and the diversity of the population sampled. The applicability of the findings reported is limited to the respondents in this study and not generalizable to the target population of undergraduate residential college women attending schools in Western Massachusetts.

Language

English

Comments

iv, 69 p. Thesis (M.S.W.)--Smith College School for Social Work, Northampton, Mass., 2012. Includes bibliographical references (p. 60-65)