Document Type

Article

Publication Date

2000

Publication Title

Latin American Research Review

Abstract

In the first decades of the twentieth century, Bolivian intellectuals and politicians debated how the country's Indian population should be incorporated into social and political life as the nation became increasingly integrated internally and forged stronger links to the world market. Public health was central to this discussion because of elite fears of contagion due to greater contact between Indians and non-Indians and the realization that if Indians were to be productive members of society, then their physical well-being had to be considered. This study examines the proposals of two Bolivian doctors, Jaime Mendoza and Nestor Morales, for improving the health of the native population in the context of the larger national debate about ethnicity and citizenship.

Keywords

Public health, History, Citizenship, Medicine, Ethnicity, Health problems, Physicians, Native North Americans

Volume

35

Issue

2

First Page

107

Last Page

129

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Rights

Copyright Latin American Research Review 2000

Comments

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