Document Type

Article

Publication Date

2006

Publication Title

Smith College Studies in Social Work

Abstract

It is increasingly difficult to distinguish natural events from those influenced by human actions. Furthermore, researchers in various fields have established that the level of devastation and the predicted likelihood of recovery of neighborhoods and communities correspond with the amount of political and socioeconomic capital held by neighborhoods and communities prior to disasters such as the Hurricane Katrina. In this paper we analyze the significance of the discourse of “natural disasters” through the framework of social ecology. We contest the neutralist discourse of “natural disasters” by underscoring the numerous interdependent sociopolitical forces, which shape the context in which disasters occur.

Volume

76

Issue

3

First Page

9

Last Page

24

DOI

doi.org/10.1300/J497v76n03_02

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Rights

© the authors

Comments

Peer reviewed accepted manuscript.

Included in

Social Work Commons

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